Our latest adoptee . . .

Andean Archie


Archie is an Andean condor who resides at Mountain View Conservation Society in Fort Langley, British Columbia. This is a non-profit society which works to save endangered species such as Archie’s. Mountain View has more than 250 mammals, birds and primates at its 125-acre site, and they have one of the best captive breeding success rates in the world.

To raise funds for its conservation work and research, the society puts it animals up for “adoption”. Recently we saw a newspaper article saying that they were having a difficult time finding people to take on Archie. The adoption coordinator at Mountain View, Louise Walters explained “I’m not sure if it’s because people think they’ll have to take him home with them and they’re a little scared of his twelve-foot wing span or whether it’s because he’s just so ugly.”


Andean Archie

Andean Archie

Naturally, when we saw his photo in the newspaper we couldn’t resist adopting him.


Andean Archie

Archie is in with a female condor names Adelaide (above) and when they have chicks the offspring are scheduled to be released in South America. Condors only lay one egg every eighteen months so this may take a while.


Condor in Argentina

This photo, courtesy of Dirk Lewis, is of an Andean condor in Argentina.



Condor in Patagonia

Condor in Patagonia

The two photos above, taken by Brian Pinkerton, are of an Andean condor
in Torres del Paine National Park in southern Chile.


Condors are carrion eaters, but may also attack wounded or newborn llamas, goats or lambs. On the sea coast they will eat dead fish, seals and eggs of sea birds.

Because they are handicapped by their weight, condors spend much of their flight time soaring on warm air currents. Maneuvering with just the tips of their wings, soaring flight is nearly effortless and very energy efficient. Condors will often stay grounded on over-cast days when there are no thermals.